AGAPE e.V.

The non-profit association Agape has been active in India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Tibet and Romania since 1991. The focus of the association is on disadvantaged children for whom the association has built orphanages and schools in slums and rural areas. The aim of the association is to leave no one behind and to give children from poor families the opportunity to receive an education. Furthermore, the association works to ensure that these children also have access to clean drinking water.

 

On our homepage we document the history of the association and thus the great life's work of the honorary chairwoman Christine Weitmann and the active members and partners from the sponsorships. Many of her projects are of course continuing and new ones are constantly being added. We provide information about the current projects of AGAPE e. V., give an insight into the concrete work of our current team and the development of the association.

 

We, that is:

Dr. Martin Maier (1st Chairman), Hans-Peter Hebel (2nd Chairman), Christine Weitmann (Honorary Chairman), Charlotte Stirn (Treasurer) and Annika Meuter (Secretary). The financial side is further supported by Josif Herlo (treasurer) and the tax consultant Elisabeth Schneiss.

 

Please feel free to contact us: We are happy about interested questions, new members and last but not least about every donation.

Welcome to our new homepage!

Here you can find out what AGAPE is committed to, about current projects and the history of the association.

Many wells in Bangladesh supply water that is not suitable for drinking. It contains harmful amounts of arsenic but also manganese and phosphate. Originally, people drank from the surface waters, which, however, are highly microbially contaminated. In order to provide people with clean drinking water, AGAPE 2015 installed SIDKO filters at central locations such as market places (Maulvi Bazaar, Lahiri Mohonpur Bazaar), hospitals (Ullapara), schools and train stations (Sholop), through which the arsenic is removed by adsorption.
Some of the 2015 installed SIDKO filters require urgent maintenance.

According to the WHO and research, the arsenic-contaminated groundwater in Bangladesh is "the greatest mass poisoning in history".